Post-P&P

I haven’t updated much though I tried multiple times. I’m currently on my way home to start my long weekend (National Hero’s Day on Monday). We’ll be having visitors tomorrow until Monday morning then I’ll be facing my second and third med school exams on Tuesday. 
We’re done with the Principles and Perspectives Module where we primarily discussed the importance of social sciences in medicine, focusing on the Biopsychosocial Approach to Medicine. It was a nice take on Medicine and I’d be lying if I say it wasn’t enjoyable. I’ve never experienced such emphasis on the integration of the life sciences to the social sciences without me, a Cell-Mol Bio major, explicitly taking up social science-heavy subjects. This is, I think, the most ideal way to view everything in life — rational but humane. Although, I must say, we missed the, arguably, most interesting two lectures in P&P which was supposed to tackle on the Filipino Perspective of Medicine. Admittedly, I didn’t read the two sets of slides provided to supplement us on our missed lectures (I only found out about the topics during the exam itself). The questions from those slides, albeit new to me, were very interesting (e.g. Indigenous elements of the self, Filipino aesthetics of beauty). Nevertheless, P&P was an exciting module, fit to be the introductory module for medical freshmen.
I’d like to say I’m jealous of our peers in other med schools who have started to dissect and stress themselves out but that won’t be true. I truly appreciate the modular approach because it makes our lectures more coherent and more in tune with one another (imagine physio tackling the nervous system while histo teaches you about the urinary) and, although we have exams almost every week, at least what we are studying are focused on similar objectives. That’s not to say, of course, that other med schools are teaching medicine the wrong way — to each its own — but trying to keep things more digestible for medical students (who already are and will still be facing loads of difficulty and stress) is highly appreciated. I just find it repulsive, though, that other, more established medical institutions scorn at how ASMPH handles its medical (+ business) curriculum. It is unconventional, true, but our fast-growing world does not concern itself with what is conventional. Our global society is thirsty for change and it’s yearning for dynamic people to bring that change. The world needs people who are unafraid to step away from the standards of the past and set higher standards for the future.

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